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Badgers receive 15 football letters of intent

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Badgers receive 15 football letters of intent
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Wednesday is national signing day in college football and at mid-morning the Wisconsin Badgers had received 15 letters of intent so far.


The most notable one so far is Pewaukee tight end T.J. Watt, the brother of NFL Defensive Player of the Year J.J. Watt and current Wisconsin fullback Derek Watt.

T.J. Watt was ranked as the state's ninth-best recruit by, and the 11th-best by ESPN. He had a hand in 16 touchdowns for Pewaukee in his senior year.

Of the 15 official recruits, eight are on offense and seven on defense. Five are from Wisconsin.

The early signers also included New Jersey quarter Tanner McEvoy, who committed to the Badgers earlier this week.

Braun denies getting drugs from Miami clinic

Milwaukee Brewers All-Star Ryan Braun denies getting performance-enhancing drugs from a clinic in Miami that reportedly sold drugs to several big league players.

Yahoo Sports said it obtained three documents from the now-defunct Bio-Genesis anti-aging clinic which listed Braun's name. Yahoo said Major League Baseball would investigate.

In a statement, Braun said his only link to the clinic was a contact made by his attorneys when they were appealing his 50-game suspension a year ago for elevated testosterone.

Braun said his lawyers were preparing his appeal when they asked Bio-Genesis operator Tony Bosch about various drug ratios, and the chances that drug samples could be tampered with.

Braun said there was a dispute over what Bosch was supposed to be paid for the information, and that's why he listed in the Bio-Genesis report under "money owed."

Braun says he's had no other relationship with Bosch. He said he has nothing to hide, and he'll fully cooperate with any inquiry into the matter.

Braun won the appeal of his suspension, citing problems with the way his drug sample was handled before it was finally tested 44 hours after it was taken. Baseball later tightened up its sampling procedures after what happened in the Braun case.