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Michelle Serkowski, left, wears a vintage wedding dress and Nancy Weeks wears modern attire. Submitted photo

Fashion show featured a touch of history

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River Falls, 54022
River Falls Wisconsin 2815 Prairie Drive / P.O. Box 25 54022

At the recent annual meeting and membership drive of the Auxiliary of the Christian Community Campus, the St. Croix County Historical Society partnered with Elan of Hudson to present a fashion show titled "Fashions Then and Now."

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Elan, 218 Locust St., presented the fashionable modern-day designs now available its shop while the historical society revealed some of the treasured vintage fashions in its collection, with bits of Hudson history.

Among the vintage outfits were a turn-of-the-century bathing suit with long black stockings and the type of bloomer outfit which had been promoted by Amelia Bloomer in the 1850s as healthier than the corseted fashions of the day.

Featured, also, was a middy blouse originally worn by Essie Williams, a colorful character from Hudson's past. Williams was an early Hudson lawyer whose home was located on the land now occupied by the Hudson Fire Department.

Closing the show was a vintage wedding dress worn by three generations of one family. The dress was worn first by Margaret Ingram when she married John Moffat Hughes in 1913. John Moffat Hughes was a member of the third generation of the Moffat Hughes family to live in the Octagon House.

The dress was worn again when their daughter, Betty Hughes, married James (Al) Swanson in 1952. Betty and Al's daughter, Peggy, was the last to wear it when she married Leslie Stern in 1989. The dress was then donated to the historical society for preservation. A picture, with a bridal portrait of all three brides, was carried by the model wearing the dress, so guests could see how the three brides looked on their wedding days.

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