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Judging by the audience applause at the first Youth Action Hudson talent show Saturday night, Hudson youth do have talent. Among the performers enjoying the spotlight were vocalists, from left, Alli Kocik, Cari Vought, Kari Pelzel and Molly Margenau. They sang "Leave the Pieces" by the Wreckers. More photos can be found on page 5A of this week's print edition. Photo by Margaret A. Ontl

'Hudson Youth Have Talent - On the Road to Stardom'

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More than 350 people turned out for the first "Hudson Youth Have Talent - On the Road to Stardom," a teen talent show sponsored by Youth Action Hudson and Hudson High School at the HHS auditorium Saturday night.

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KARE 11 meteorologist Belinda Jensen, a former student of HHS Principal Ed Lucas, served as emcee and introduced 17 acts that included singers, instrumentalists and dancers.

Evaluating the performances were judges Greg Tuchel, Donna Bennett, Clara Ashwood, Andy Bernstrom, Alyssa Mayfield and Nancy Burman. Winners in each of the three categories were awarded $100. A fourth prize was awarded to the audience favorite.

The winners were Max Malanaphy, vocal; Kyle Featherstone, instrumental; Kristine Zappa, dance; and Mannah Hontana, audience choice.

YAH director Wendi Heuermann said the event was a success and expects that the show will be an annual event. "The look of joy on the contestants' faces as the audience applauded their performance was really wonderful to see. The show was 100 percent audience supported. What a great community of students and adults we have," she said.

Helping sponsor the event were Back to Books, Croix Valley Veterinarian Hospital, Hudson Flower Shop and WESTconsin Credit Union. YAH Americorps staffer Erin Manor led the committee that organized the talent show with help from other staff members and volunteers.

For more information about Youth Action Hudson, call (715) 386-9803 or visit www.youth actionhudson.org

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