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Letter-Obituary for white goose?

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Dear Editor,

Whitey the Goose, presumed dead - Summer 2012.

Whitey the Goose, also known as Whiteford, Pale Face, Al Byno, and, unaccountably, Princess, was the Embden gander who flew to freedom on the day of The Great Goose Roundup in June of 2006. Whitey and more than two dozen other domestic geese (Toulouse and Embdens) had been declared aves non gratae by the town fathers and arrangements were made to remove them to a farm in Prescott where they would join an established flock. All went well with the capture until, at the very end, Whitey made his successful bid for the wild life writ large.

In a short while, he was a solid member of the Canada goose flock in the riverfront park, keeping company with two injured bachelor Canadas, flying with the flock from the marina to the northerly spot on the river where the swans enjoy their winter smorgasbord, nibbling the green grasses of spring and summer, reveling in the changes of the seasons.

He was an astonishment and a wonder, a surprise of bright white amongst the grey and black of the Canada geese, a delight and a puzzle of nature to everyone who saw him. He charmed us all with his excellent behavior, his commitment to his fellows and his splendid good looks for a fine flight of years.

He is survived and mourned by his doting biographer, Lucie Singh, his special park friend, J.J. Barnes, his boon goose companions, Stumpy and Bumwing in particular, and a host of anglers, townsfolk, walkers, runners, interested dogs, children, tourists, boaters, and many more who knew him, saw him and marveled at him. We are the poorer for his leaving us.

Post Script: Should anyone have information concerning recent sightings of Whitey rendering this death notice premature, no one would be happier than me to issue a retraction!

Lucie Singh, Hudson

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