Ryley Gorman wasn’t setting out to draw any attention this month when he dashed into Second Street traffic. “I was just trying to do the right thing,” the 2006 Hudson High School graduate said. Gorman said that meant pushing a drunken pedestrian out of the way as a truck was bearing down on the man. The pedestrian escaped harm, Gorman explained. But he didn’t. In a scene seemingly plucked from “Back to the Future” - where Marty McFly shoves his father out of traffic only to be struck by a truck himself - Gorman suffered the same fate. He said the truck, going about 25 mph, clipped him in the process and left him with an injured hand. The driver of the truck didn’t stop for the crash, which occurred at 1:30 a.m. Nov. 20 at Second and Walnut streets just outside the Agave Kitchen. The incident was commemorated later on Agave’s popular daily message board facing northbound traffic on Second Street, which read “Ryley Gorman is good and did good. #lifesaver” Gorman, 28, said the incident unfolded while he and some friends were hanging out at the restaurant and noticed the man stumbling around in the middle of Second Street. Some were making light of the situation, he said, until they saw a northbound truck that wasn’t slowing down. What happened after the collision remains a bit of a mystery to Gorman, an account representative at the Amanda Francescato State Farm Agency on Second Street. He’s not sure what happened to the man he saved. “I was really in a pretty big daze after it happened,” he said, recalling that the man was wearing a hoodie. As for the driver of offending truck, Hudson Police Chief Marty Jensen said that person also has not yet been identified. Gorman was checked out by EMS workers but declined a trip to the hospital. He said he’s been keeping an eye on the injured hand and will have it looked at if the swelling doesn’t relinquish. He said he’s been struck more than once by the thought of how differently things could have turned out that night on Second Street. “He could have been seriously injured,” Gorman said of the drunken pedestrian. And for him, too. Gorman said he sustained a brain injury as a child. That makes him susceptible to more serious head injuries, and he was fortunate to avoid one in the incident on Second Street. “I spent a lot of time thinking how it could have been worse,” he said. Gorman said he didn’t save the man in order to receive accolades or headlines. He said he just did what felt right. “My parents raised me in a way to always strive to do the right thing,” he said. Gorman brushed aside praise for his role in the event, saying he doesn't see himself as a hero. "Our U.S. armed service men and women are the real heroes," he said.  

Ryley Gorman wasn’t setting out to draw any attention this month when he dashed into Second Street traffic.“I was just trying to do the right thing,” the 2006 Hudson High School graduate said.Gorman said that meant pushing a drunken pedestrian out of the way as a truck was bearing down on the man. The pedestrian escaped harm, Gorman explained.But he didn’t.In a scene seemingly plucked from “Back to the Future” - where Marty McFly shoves his father out of traffic only to be struck by a truck himself - Gorman suffered the same fate. He said the truck, going about 25 mph, clipped him in the process and left him with an injured hand.The driver of the truck didn’t stop for the crash, which occurred at 1:30 a.m. Nov. 20 at Second and Walnut streets just outside the Agave Kitchen.The incident was commemorated later on Agave’s popular daily message board facing northbound traffic on Second Street, which read “Ryley Gorman is good and did good. #lifesaver”Gorman, 28, said the incident unfolded while he and some friends were hanging out at the restaurant and noticed the man stumbling around in the middle of Second Street. Some were making light of the situation, he said, until they saw a northbound truck that wasn’t slowing down.What happened after the collision remains a bit of a mystery to Gorman, an account representative at the Amanda Francescato State Farm Agency on Second Street. He’s not sure what happened to the man he saved. “I was really in a pretty big daze after it happened,” he said, recalling that the man was wearing a hoodie.As for the driver of offending truck, Hudson Police Chief Marty Jensen said that person also has not yet been identified.Gorman was checked out by EMS workers but declined a trip to the hospital. He said he’s been keeping an eye on the injured hand and will have it looked at if the swelling doesn’t relinquish.He said he’s been struck more than once by the thought of how differently things could have turned out that night on Second Street.“He could have been seriously injured,” Gorman said of the drunken pedestrian.And for him, too. Gorman said he sustained a brain injury as a child. That makes him susceptible to more serious head injuries, and he was fortunate to avoid one in the incident on Second Street.“I spent a lot of time thinking how it could have been worse,” he said.Gorman said he didn’t save the man in order to receive accolades or headlines. He said he just did what felt right.“My parents raised me in a way to always strive to do the right thing,” he said.Gorman brushed aside praise for his role in the event, saying he doesn't see himself as a hero."Our U.S. armed service men and women are the real heroes," he said. 

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