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Arvin I. Lovaas

Arvin I. Lovaas

Arvin Irving Lovaas died at his home in Fort Collins, Colorado on December 21, 2018 surrounded by his loving family. He was born on March 4, 1931 in Red Granite Wisconsin, moving to Hudson soon after birth. He was a first-generation Norwegian American, the second son of Simon and Petra Lovaas (nee Granmo). Arvin graduated from Hudson High School and went on to Wisconsin State College-River Falls where he graduated with a Chemistry degree in 1953. He accepted a federal grant to study atomic energy at University of Rochester, in New York State where he received a Masters degree in Radiation Biology. He stayed on in Rochester for several years, as a research assistant, and co-published multiple papers examining the effects of radiation on human and animal tissues. During this period he met and married Judy Barker, of Rochester. After the birth of their son, Steven Rolf Lovaas, he accepted a position with the Colorado State Health Department in Denver, moving several years later to Colorado State University, in Fort Collins CO. While working for the university, and welcoming his daughter Perri Lovaas to the world, he pursued and completed his PhD in Radiation Biology (1972). He became the environmental/ Radiation Safety officer for CSU where he served until his retirement in 1995. He was active in national scientific organizations: Sigma XI and Health Physics Society. His family and friends remember him for his quiet, thoughtful manner, and for his integrity and kindness. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Judy; his son Steven (Heidi); his daughter Perri Pelletier (Michael), and his granddaughters Annelise and Ivy. He is also survived by his niece Andrea Lovaas Havenar (Paul) of Fort Collins; his nephew, William Lovaas (Kaki) of Oak Park, IL; his great nephew Peter Lovaas of Cincinnati OH; and great niece, Marit Lovaas of Chicago, IL. He was predeceased by his parents Simon and Petra Lovaas; his brother Ivan Lovaas and his great nephew Benjamin Simon Lovaas.

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