When newly-hired New Richmond School District Supervisor of School Nutrition Bobbie Guyette was a dietetic student, she was required to spend time in each area of dietetic practice to help her figure out which area would be her specialty and what she would like to do in her career once she graduated. In her first rotation as as student, Guyette was placed in a school nutrition program and it took very little time for her to fall in love with the work she was doing to help students and staff alike stay healthy and eat right. “After I figured out school nutrition was what I wanted to go into, I focused all of my master’s degree work around it,” Guyette said. “My thesis focused on the hardships rural schools face when purchasing food for their programs. I have been lucky enough to work in school nutrition throughout my professional career.”Guyette grew up in Shiocton, a small town in the Fox Valley area, but due to her husband’s service in the military, the couple were required to move many times over the years.

“We both knew we wanted to get back to our home state of Wisconsin,” Guyette said. “We both love the western side of the state, and I particularly enjoy being close to the Twin Cities. The area surrounding New Richmond School District is perfect for our hobbies and interests.”School nutrition stood out to Guyette as her prefered profession early on because it was a way for her to use all of her skills that she was trained to use during her time in school. “My expertise around nutritional health is used on a daily basis to provide students with foods they will enjoy and that will help them learn and grow at the same time,” Guyette said. “I get to put my food service and culinary skills to work regularly when supervising and training school nutrition staff. My clinical knowledge is also applied when working with students with special dietary needs. In summary, no day is the same in school nutrition. The variety of work and room for creativity is what pushes me forward every day.”Among the many challenges Guyette has come up against in her time as a school nutritionist, the biggest is keeping herself and the staff well-versed in the ever-changing federal program regulations. “Federal policies around nutrition and food safety are continuously being assessed and updated. These changes must be explained and understood by all school nutrition staff members,” Guyette said. “Those changes are sometimes not easy to implement, and may change a staff member’s daily routine drastically. Students are our customers and our top priority. Regulation changes should and will be explained to students and families as they go into effect.”According to Guyette, being a supervisor of school nutritionist means being the administrator for the complete food service program for the whole district. “For the New Richmond School District this includes breakfast service, lunch service, after school snack programs, and a variety of catering events for staff, students, and the community,” Guyette said. “This position oversees these programs from both the business and service side of the work. Meaning I am responsible for our fiscal solvency and overall program success.”Along with the challenges and adjustments her new job will present, Guyette is excited to get started with her new job with the New Richmond School District. “I am extremely excited in regards to the potential growth of serving locally-raised food in our district,” Guyette said. “The high school ag department here has so much already set up and utilized in our school cafeterias. For example, the hydroponically-grown lettuce is served on our salad bar when it is available. I hope to work closely with staff and students to support and increase the amount of food raised by our students and by local farmers.”Guyette plans to start the school year by focusing on getting to know her new staff and finding out how they work together as a team.“I also want to learn first-hand what our students like and dislike about the current menus and move forward from there using their feedback as our framework,” Guyette said.When newly-hired New Richmond School District Supervisor of School Nutrition Bobbie Guyette was a dietetic student, she was required to spend time in each area of dietetic practice to help her figure out which area would be her specialty and what she would like to do in her career once she graduated. In her first rotation as as student, Guyette was placed in a school nutrition program and it took very little time for her to fall in love with the work she was doing to help students and staff alike stay healthy and eat right. “After I figured out school nutrition was what I wanted to go into, I focused all of my master’s degree work around it,” Guyette said. “My thesis focused on the hardships rural schools face when purchasing food for their programs. I have been lucky enough to work in school nutrition throughout my professional career.”Guyette grew up in Shiocton, a small town in the Fox Valley area, but due to her husband’s service in the military, the couple were required to move many times over the years.

“We both knew we wanted to get back to our home state of Wisconsin,” Guyette said. “We both love the western side of the state, and I particularly enjoy being close to the Twin Cities. The area surrounding New Richmond School District is perfect for our hobbies and interests.”School nutrition stood out to Guyette as her prefered profession early on because it was a way for her to use all of her skills that she was trained to use during her time in school. “My expertise around nutritional health is used on a daily basis to provide students with foods they will enjoy and that will help them learn and grow at the same time,” Guyette said. “I get to put my food service and culinary skills to work regularly when supervising and training school nutrition staff. My clinical knowledge is also applied when working with students with special dietary needs. In summary, no day is the same in school nutrition. The variety of work and room for creativity is what pushes me forward every day.”Among the many challenges Guyette has come up against in her time as a school nutritionist, the biggest is keeping herself and the staff well-versed in the ever-changing federal program regulations. “Federal policies around nutrition and food safety are continuously being assessed and updated. These changes must be explained and understood by all school nutrition staff members,” Guyette said. “Those changes are sometimes not easy to implement, and may change a staff member’s daily routine drastically. Students are our customers and our top priority. Regulation changes should and will be explained to students and families as they go into effect.”According to Guyette, being a supervisor of school nutritionist means being the administrator for the complete food service program for the whole district. “For the New Richmond School District this includes breakfast service, lunch service, after school snack programs, and a variety of catering events for staff, students, and the community,” Guyette said. “This position oversees these programs from both the business and service side of the work. Meaning I am responsible for our fiscal solvency and overall program success.”Along with the challenges and adjustments her new job will present, Guyette is excited to get started with her new job with the New Richmond School District. “I am extremely excited in regards to the potential growth of serving locally-raised food in our district,” Guyette said. “The high school ag department here has so much already set up and utilized in our school cafeterias. For example, the hydroponically-grown lettuce is served on our salad bar when it is available. I hope to work closely with staff and students to support and increase the amount of food raised by our students and by local farmers.”Guyette plans to start the school year by focusing on getting to know her new staff and finding out how they work together as a team.“I also want to learn first-hand what our students like and dislike about the current menus and move forward from there using their feedback as our framework,” Guyette said.

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